The Cranky Taxpayer

Facilities II


Accreditation | Attendance | Corruption | Cost | Failing Board | Discipline | Eat Cake | NCLB | FOIA Suit | Waste $ | SOL Scores | SGP Scores
Facilities I | Facilities II | Costly Bureaucrats


The BCWH Facility Study also has data for the elementary schools.  Here is a summary:
 
School Bldg. SF Capa-city Enroll-ment Spec. Ed Faculty 02 SOL % Capa-city % Sp. Ed Faculty per 13.6 Students SF per Kid
Bellevue 55623 396 275 33 28 78.2 69% 12% 1.38 202
Blackwell + Annex 120763 1056 537 138 47 56.5 51% 26% 1.19 225
Broad Rock 43279 330 417 46 38 72.5 126% 11% 1.24 104
Carver 100000 946 638 85 68 46.0 67% 13% 1.45 157
Cary 46711 374 331 32 33 60.6 89% 10% 1.36 141
Chimborazo 75370 572 561 72 53 40.8 98% 13% 1.28 134
Clark Springs 50376 308 426 46 39 51.8 138% 11% 1.25 118
Fairfield Court 44398 440 388 46 39 32.3 88% 12% 1.37 114
Fisher 44222 396 366 53 39 89.0 92% 14% 1.45 121
Fox 58260 330 421 46 36 92.4 128% 11% 1.16 138
Francis 56954 462 544 62 45 50.0 118% 11% 1.13 105
Ginter Park/Mary Scott 107878 616 682 81 73 63.9 111% 12% 1.46 158
Greene 41490 330 470 38 35 70.4 142% 8% 1.01 88
Henry 44725 396 347 71 39 47.2 88% 20% 1.53 129
Holton 80548 594 563 82 51 67.0 95% 15% 1.23 143
Jones 80548 594 452 62 48 50.7 76% 14% 1.44 178
Mason 67048 528 402 65 44 33.0 76% 16% 1.49 167
Maymont 35959 286 248 55 33 52.2 87% 22% 1.81 145
Munford 64468 462 460 90 46 90.5 100% 20% 1.36 140
Norrell + Annex 60742 462 411 66 28 50.3 89% 16% 0.93 148
Oak Grove + Annex 70141 484 449 58 32 50.9 93% 13% 0.97 156
Overby-Sheppard 49300 418 409 66 43 43.5 98% 16% 1.43 121
Redd 74471 374 487 58 39 77.4 130% 12% 1.09 153
Reid 64964 594 667 104 51 58.3 112% 16% 1.04 97
Southampton 56521 506 421 70 41 76.7 83% 17% 1.32 134
Stuart 44408 396 494 50 44 79.4 125% 10% 1.21 90
Summer Hill/Ruffin Road 48672 418 509 49 50 39.1 122% 10% 1.34 96
Swansboro 48183 285 337 34 33 74.7 118% 10% 1.33 143
Westover Hills 50008 352 413 45 38 62.8 117% 11% 1.25 121
Whitcomb Court 44398 418 401 30 36 40.3 96% 7% 1.22 111
Woodville 76928 594 617 101 57 45.0 104% 16% 1.26 125
Total 1907356 14717 14143 1934 1326 59.2 96% 14% 1.28 135
State           77.3     1.36051  

The table also includes SOL scores from the State Education Department web site.

The first thing that jumps out of these data is that the Richmond elementary SOL scores are far (over 18 points) below the state average.  But then, we already knew that.

Thirteen of our elementary schools are over their capacities. 

As with the middle schools, there is slightly more unused capacity in the larger elementary schools.

Next we see a much smaller range of space per student than in the high and middle schools.  In terms of enrollment there is no particular pattern to the data.

In terms of capacity, the larger schools have more room, as you would expect from the lower enrollments.

All told, 4% of our elementary capacity (592 seats) is being wasted.  That is less than the 19% (2859 seats) in the middle and high schools but still an affront to the taxpayers (not to mention the parents of the kids in the thirteen overcrowded elementary schools).

Blackwell and Maymont have the largest percentages of special education students

The trend of the data suggests that the larger schools have larger shares of special ed. students but little Maymont, Henry, and Munford also have unusually large special ed. contingents.

Turning to the main issue: None of these factors seems to have much to do with performance on the SOL.

You'll recall that we have the one of the worst SOL performances in the state.  In the elementary schools, the SOL performance ranges from suburban levels at Munford and Fox to Third World levels (below the 40 point division average in Petersburg) at Fairfield and Mason.

If we look for correlations between the SOL scores and the facility data we won't find much:

Those data do not suggest that crowds of kids are being admitted to the high-performing schools. 

Likewise, there's not much correlation between SOL scores and the number of special ed. students or the number of faculty.

Perhaps this last graph is the most interesting:  The slope of the fitted line says that, if anything, adding more teachers impairs the SOL scores.  The very low R2 probably tells us that there is no correlation at all.  Thus, as with the high and middle schools, adding teachers, even very expensive teachers, does not correlate with improved SOL scores in our schools.

These data again suggest that the millions we are spending on extra teachers (notably in our elementary and middle schools), is wasted money as far as student performance on the SOL tests. 

The next time you hear our School Board asking for more money, you might want to remind them that our problem is not money.  Our problem is getting the kids educated.  Our schools are spending too much money already but they are not getting the job done.

 

Back to the Top

High Taxes | High Crime | Lousy Schools | Obdurate Bureaucrats

Last updated 04/01/12
Please send questions or comments to John Butcher